Good content is sometimes not enough, the users must reach it so they can see it's good!

So wrong on so many levels

Posted: October 19th, 2009 | Author: | Filed under: Patterns, Usability fail | Tags: , , | 1 Comment »

I have update the “All in one seo pack” for wordpress and it insisted that i update the configuration page. I went and checked the page an this is what i have found:

seopack

It amazes me how awful is this form made, I think it’s deliberately made so you fuck up. Let’s see why:

1. the “Reset” option in on the right. (I’m not saying the submit must be on the right, but it’s the most common that way)
2. the “Reset” button is bigger and has the same design as the “Update” button. That and 1. makes it most likely to be pressed first
3. both buttons have the same design, hence they are equally important? i don’t think so, the call to action button must be the “update” button. Keep in mind that “Reset” is a destructive action.
4. what’s with the “>>” ? the arrows on the first button point to the second, which kindda’ makes the second the call to action, but the arrows on the second? there’s no extra step, there’s only a form.


Use search buttons

Posted: October 19th, 2009 | Author: | Filed under: Good practices, Patterns, Usability fail | Tags: , , | 6 Comments »

A basic usability test (very cheap also) is logging remote on another person’s computer and watching him/her use the app/website/tool. It’s eye opening.

So I have seen my mother (who is not a computer savy person) hovering the page in search of buttons. When she searches things she doesn’t use the keyboard, she presses the “Search” button, and when that’s not available she gets confused. If the search field has an arrow image background on the right side, she tries to click that arrow and gets puzzled when nothing happens.

use_search_buttons

So, please use search buttons.

Oh, and please don’t name them “Go” or “>>” or stuff like that, name them “search”, and even put a magnifying glass on them.


Links vs. buttons

Posted: April 26th, 2009 | Author: | Filed under: Good practices, VS | Tags: , , , | 3 Comments »

When dealing with webpages, some usability experts say we should use links when the user is gonna get on a different page and buttons when the user makes an action.

Link to another page »   vs.  

I don’t really care. I don’t care because users don’t care.

Let’s get things a little further, what’s a button? Does it have to have borders? Different color?

Is a icon followed by a link really a link or a button? I see those things like buttons, others see it like “fancy links” or “descriptive links” or “visual links”.

One thing i agree with, though: forms should have “hard to miss” primary action button, you cannot put a link there mainly because it will not be a “primary action”, there are other links on a page so the weight of a “submit link” won’t be so different.